Motus Home Hand Mentor users complete more rehab than in a clinical setting, reporting accelerated recovery after a stroke.

FDA class I device with active assistance.

Motus Home Hand Mentor users complete more rehab than in a clinical setting, reporting accelerated recovery after a stroke.

FDA class I device with active assistance.

Motus Home Hand Mentor users complete more rehab than in a clinical setting, reporting accelerated recovery after a stroke.

FDA class I device with active assistance.

Academic Studies

“Telerehabilitation Robotics: Overview of approaches and clinical outcomes”

Housley et al. 2018

“A pneumatic muscle hand therapy device”

The development of a pneumatic muscle driven hand therapy device, the Mentor trade mark, reinforces the need for volitional activation of joint movement while concurrently offering knowledge of results about range of motion, muscle activity or resistance to movement.

Koeneman et al. 2004

“Improving Quality of Life and Depression After Stroke Through Telerehabilitation”

The Hand Mentor improves upper limb function to the same extent as traditional home exercise program.
Bajaj, S. et al. 2015

“The HAAPI Trial: A Novel Robotics Delivery Approach in Stroke Rehabilitation”

The Hand Mentor improves quality of life and depression symptoms when utilized in the stroke survivor’s home.
Wolf et al. 2015

“Expanding Tele-rehabilitation of Stroke Through In-home Robot-assisted Therapy”

Hand Mentor rehabilitation in the home improves upper limb function and provides a cost effective alternative to clinic based therapy for for consumers and providers.
Butler et al. 2014

“Quality-of-Life Change Associated With RoboticAssisted Therapy to Improve Hand Motor Function in Patients With Subacute Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial”

The Hand Mentor is an effective adjunct to deliver intensive rehabilitation important in upper limb functional recovery.
Kutner et al. 2010

“A Tongue-Controlled Robotic Rehabilitation: A Feasibility Study in Stroke Survivors”

The Hand Mentor can be successfully adapted with other assistive technologies to provide new hybrid rehabilitation paradigms.
Ostadabbas et al. 2016

“Dominance of the unaffected hemisphere motor network and its role in the behavior of chronic stroke survivors. Frontiers in neuroscience”

Bajaj, S. et al. 2016

“Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Pilot Study of D-Cycloserine in Chronic Stroke.”

A relatively short duration of Hand Mentor rehabilitation (18 hours) provides significant improvement in upper limb function and quality of life.
Butler et al. 2015

“Design of a robotic upper extremity repetitive therapy device.”



The development of a pneumatic muscle (PM) driven therapeutic device, the RUPERT™, has the potential of providing a low cost and safe take-home method of supplementing therapy in addition to in the clinic treatment.

Koeneman et al. 2005

“Home-based robot-assisted ankle rehabilitation for chronic stroke survivors.”

This study provides preliminary evidence that home-based rehabilitation provided by the Foot Mentor is a viable alternative for the treatment of distal lower extremity dysfunction in chronic stroke survivors.
Lynskey et al. 2014

“Effects of Combined Robotic Therapy and Repetitive-Task Practice on Upper-Extremity Function in a Patient With Chronic Stroke”

The Hand Mentor provides an effective means to improve upper limb motor function and performance of activities of daily living.
Rosenstein et al. 2008

“Increasing Access to Cost Effective Home-Based Rehabilitation for Rural Veteran Stroke Survivors”

Home-based, robotic therapy provided by the Hand Mentor reduced costs (65%), while expanding access to a rehabilitation modality for people who would not otherwise have received care. Those who participated made clinically meaningful improvements in the use of their impaired extremities using a robotic device in the home.
Housley et al. 2016

“Improving upper extremity function and quality of life with a tongue driven exoskeleton: a pilot study quantifying stroke rehabilitation”

This pilot study gives preliminary insight into the volume of treatment time required to improve outcomes.
Housley et al. 2016

“Expanding stroke telerehabilitation services to rural veterans: qualitative study on patient experiences using the robotic stroke therapy delivery and monitoring system program”

The Hand Mentor provides a valuable rehabilitation option for extending current treatment or maintaining rehabilitation when benefits are exhausted.
Cherry et al. 2015

“Incorporating roboticassisted telerehabilitation in a home program to improve arm function following stroke: a case study”

When combined with a home exercise program, the Hand Mentor provides similar or greater improvements in upper limb function that home exercise alone.
Linder et al. 2013

“Feasibility Studies of Robot-Assisted Stroke Rehabilitation at Clinic and Home Settings Using RUPERT”



Zhang et al. 2011

Academic Studies

“Telerehabilitation Robotics: Overview of approaches and clinical outcomes”

Housley et al. 2018

“Improving Quality of Life and Depression After Stroke Through Telerehabilitation”

The Hand Mentor improves upper limb function to the same extent as traditional home exercise program.
Bajaj, S. et al. 2015

“The HAAPI Trial: A Novel Robotics Delivery Approach in Stroke Rehabilitation”

The Hand Mentor improves quality of life and depression symptoms when utilized in the stroke survivor’s home.
Wolf et al. 2015

“Expanding Tele-rehabilitation of Stroke Through In-home Robot-assisted Therapy”

Hand Mentor rehabilitation in the home improves upper limb function and provides a cost effective alternative to clinic based therapy for for consumers and providers.
Butler et al. 2014

“Quality-of-Life Change Associated With RoboticAssisted Therapy to Improve Hand Motor Function in Patients With Subacute Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial”

The Hand Mentor is an effective adjunct to deliver intensive rehabilitation important in upper limb functional recovery.
Kutner et al. 2010

“Increasing Access to Cost Effective Home-Based Rehabilitation for Rural Veteran Stroke Survivors”

Home-based, robotic therapy provided by the Hand Mentor reduced costs (65%), while expanding access to a rehabilitation modality for people who would not otherwise have received care. Those who participated made clinically meaningful improvements in the use of their impaired extremities using a robotic device in the home.
Housley et al. 2016

“Improving upper extremity function and quality of life with a tongue driven exoskeleton: a pilot study quantifying stroke rehabilitation”

This pilot study gives preliminary insight into the volume of treatment time required to improve outcomes.
Housley et al. 2016

“A Tongue-Controlled Robotic Rehabilitation: A Feasibility Study in Stroke Survivors”

The Hand Mentor can be successfully adapted with other assistive technologies to provide new hybrid rehabilitation paradigms.
Ostadabbas et al. 2016

“Dominance of the unaffected hemisphere motor network and its role in the behavior of chronic stroke survivors. Frontiers in neuroscience”

Bajaj, S. et al. 2016

“Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Pilot Study of D-Cycloserine in Chronic Stroke.”

A relatively short duration of Hand Mentor rehabilitation (18 hours) provides significant improvement in upper limb function and quality of life.
Butler et al. 2015

“Home-based robot-assisted ankle rehabilitation for chronic stroke survivors.”

This study provides preliminary evidence that home-based rehabilitation provided by the Foot Mentor is a viable alternative for the treatment of distal lower extremity dysfunction in chronic stroke survivors.
Lynskey et al. 2014

“Effects of Combined Robotic Therapy and Repetitive-Task Practice on Upper-Extremity Function in a Patient With Chronic Stroke”

The Hand Mentor provides an effective means to improve upper limb motor function and performance of activities of daily living.
Rosenstein et al. 2008

“Expanding stroke telerehabilitation services to rural veterans: qualitative study on patient experiences using the robotic stroke therapy delivery and monitoring system program”

The Hand Mentor provides a valuable rehabilitation option for extending current treatment or maintaining rehabilitation when benefits are exhausted.
Cherry et al. 2015

“Incorporating roboticassisted telerehabilitation in a home program to improve arm function following stroke: a case study”

When combined with a home exercise program, the Hand Mentor provides similar or greater improvements in upper limb function that home exercise alone.
Linder et al. 2013

 

 

Is Motus Home Right for Me?

Find out if you can increase and speed up your recovery by taking our Motus Assessment

My Injury

Month
Year

My Movement

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30 DAY RISK-FREE TRIAL

Try out the device RISK-FREE for 30 days & see the improvement for yourself
firsthand.

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Need more information before starting a trial? Sign up for a demo to learn more about the device.

RIGHT FOR YOU?

Our stroke recovery specialists help determine if you can increase and speed up your recovery.

Are you getting enough therapy to regain function?
Regaining function requires 400-600 repetitions daily.

Nudo, et al. 1996

Average dose completed in traditional outpatient therapy is

53 Repetitions.

Lang, et al. 2009

Motus users average dose per therapy session was

159 Repetitions.

Housley, et al. 2016 *

Compared to average insured outpatient rehab, cost is

same price for 3x.

the effective dose.
The only FDA Class 1 at-home
stroke rehab device with

active assistance

in the world.
*Repetition is activity dependent and is defined as either
two or three sign changes of velocity in movement.
Limited therapy hours is a primary reason stroke recovery takes a long time.
Let’s get to recovery faster by boosting your hours of rehab.

 

 

Is Motus Home Right for Me?

Find out if you can increase and speed up your recovery by taking our Motus Assessment

My Injury

Month
Year

My Movement

My Information

Name
Email
Phone